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HOME > FILMS > TROLLEY DANCES > FILM GUIDE

TROLLEY DANCES

FILM GUIDE

Dances and Venues
Jean Isaacs, the founder and artistic director of Trolley Dances created two new pieces. Imagine a Mexican Restaurant finds dancers at the trolley stop near SD City College. Flanked by new high rises, their Latin themed dance is a counterpoint to the unspooling trolley line. Attack of the Swiss Gardeners is on the site of restored 19th century Victorian home, built by a San Diego seafarer. Like clockwork gnomes the dancers rise up from the porch, tumble down the stairs and begin gardening --- creating a dancescape and greenspace, which transforms the environment.

East Village and particularly the newly developed Lillian Place, an affordable housing project, was home to an historically black San Diego community. It was a lively area of black businesses, residences and boarding houses. African American choreographers Rand� Dorn (To Start Again) and Kyle Abraham (Untitled 10:07:07) enliven Lillian Place with personal, idiosyncratic work not typically seen in the hallways and entryways of this newly constructed community development.

Yolande Snaith, described as a �true original� by Stanley Kubrick, is a past chair of the UC San Diego Dance Department. In Ten Green Bottles Standing on the Bar young dancers transform a fifteen foot long wooden table game into a western bar, a locus for fast flying bottles, rather than fisticuffs. Movement stops, starts and burst into feats of juggling and dares. The setting for this performance is the Wheelworks building. The space is packed with artifacts salvaged from the 20th century industrial buildings, which supported a thriving working class community.

John Diaz�s dancers are arrayed under a portico behind the new Museum of Contemporary Art. In Concourse Dance the dancers dart between Richard Serra�s massive metal cubes, entertaining passengers disembarking from the trolleys and Amtrak trains pulling into the station. The music of Igor Korneitchouk, a San Diego composer, adds new meanings to the concept of �transportation

LINKS


Abraham in Motion

Rande' Dorn

Dancemedia

ARCHIVES

Mark Freeman Papers, University Archives, Special Collections and University Archives, Library and Information Access, San Diego State University.

Special Collections may be contacted via telephone (619-594-6791), fax (619-594-0466) or email scref@rohan.sdsu.edu.
Special Collections
Mark Freeman Papers, 1997-2008

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   Copyright © 2005 Mark Freeman. All Rights Reserved.